Socrates

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This article is about the classical Greek philosopher. For other uses of Socrates, see Socrates (disambiguation).
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external image 200px-Socrates_Louvre.jpg

Socrates
Full name
Socrates (Σωκράτης)
Born
c. 469 / 470 BC[1]
Died
399 BC (age approx. 71)
Era
Ancient philosophy
Region
Western Philosophy
School

Classical Greek
Main interests
Epistemology, ethics
Notable ideas
Socratic method, Socratic irony
Influenced



UWASocrates gobeirne cropped.jpg
UWASocrates gobeirne cropped.jpg


Part of a series on
Socrates
"I know that I know nothing"
Social gadfly · Trial of Socrates

Eponymous concepts
Socratic dialogue · Socratic method

Socratic problem · Socratic paradox

Disciples

Plato · Xenophon

Antisthenes · Aristippus

Related topics
Platonism · Stoicism

Cynics · Cyrenaics

The Clouds
v · d · e
Socrates (Greek: Σωκράτης, Ancient Greek pronunciation: [sɔːˈkratɛːs], Sōkrátēs; c. 469 BC–399 BC,[1] pronounced /ˈsɒkrətiːz/ in English) was a classical Greek Athenian philosopher. Credited as one of the founders of Western philosophy, he is an enigmatic figure known chiefly through the accounts of later classical writers, especially the writings of his students Plato and Xenophon, and the plays of his contemporary Aristophanes. Many would claim that Plato's dialogues are the most comprehensive accounts of Socrates to survive from antiquity.[2]